• Can a Hot Drink Cool You Down?
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    Can a Hot Drink Cool You Down?

    [♪ INTRO] When the heat of summer sets in, people flock to the beaches or head to the mountains to cool off. But in some arid parts of the world, on hot, dry days, people cool off by drinking hot beverages. Which doesn’t make a lot of sense, if you’ve never heard of the practice. If a cup of hot cocoa on a cold, snowy day makes you feel warmer, how could a hot drink also make you feel cooler? But there’s evidence to back up this age-old tradition, if the conditions are just right. In a study published in 2012, subjects exercised on a stationary bike. And they drank…

  • Bitcoin: How Cryptocurrencies Work
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    Bitcoin: How Cryptocurrencies Work

    Say there’s a coin that’s currently worth hundreds of U.S. dollars, but it’s not made of gold, or platinum, or any precious metal. In fact, it’s not the kind of coin you can hold in your hand or stick in a piggy bank. It’s a digital currency, which means it only exists electronically. I’m talking about bitcoin. Bitcoin doesn’t work like most money. It isn’t attached to a state or government, so it doesn’t have a central issuing authority or regulatory body. Basically, that means there’s no organization deciding when to make more bitcoins, figuring out how many to produce, keeping track of where they are, or investigating fraud. So…

  • 5 Delightful Color-Changing Minerals
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    5 Delightful Color-Changing Minerals

    Thanks to Generation Genius for sponsoring this episode of SciShow. Go to generationgenius.com and check out their next-generation science videos for grades K through five. [♪ INTRO ] From the bedrock that supports buildings, to the bones that let us dance the night away, minerals are pretty amazing. And with their rainbow of colors, they also add some sparkle to our lives. Normally, individual minerals are one color, that’s not always the case. Some look multi-colored upon a single glance, and others look different depending on whether you’re looking at them in the sun or under incandescent light. Some minerals even look different if you rotate them. When you do,…

  • Green Web Hosting Hostpapa WebHost Review
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    Green Web Hosting Hostpapa WebHost Review

    welcome to my review of whole spa pas the green web hosting web hosting okay let’s get started as usual I talked to have a lot to say so the first thing I want estelle you is this look appearing top right corner life support is online I meters a real person working behind this business offering you support you can’t beat that they talk about 202 reviews at 4.7 out of 5 read it average well I don’t really necessarily believe that the usual here let’s check it out I want to host Papa and I’ll see real quick I like this 10 pages on one page number six…

  • This Parasitic Plant Stole Over 100 Genes From Other Plants | SciShow News
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    This Parasitic Plant Stole Over 100 Genes From Other Plants | SciShow News

    This episode of SciShow News is supported by NordVPN. Head over to nordVPN.com/SciShow to learn more about virtual private networks and internet security. [♪ INTRO] Plants might seem kind of dull and boring, but they are full of intrigue. And two new papers published this week showed just how manipulative and cunning they can be. The first, published in Nature Plants, found that parasitic dodder plants from the genus Cuscuta have stolen dozens of genes from their hosts. And they don’t just take genes — they use them too. You see, dodders are parasitic plants that don’t have chlorophyll—the pigment which captures light energy during photosynthesis. That means they can’t…

  • Why Scurvy Shouldn’t Exist
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    Why Scurvy Shouldn’t Exist

    Thanks to Brilliant for supporting this whole week of SciShow. Go to Brilliant.org/SciShow to learn more. [♪ INTRO] When you hear the word “scurvy,” you probably think of jokes about pirates, but this disease can actually be really serious. Its symptoms include bleeding gums; bumpy, rashy skin; and joint pain, and if it’s not treated, it can be deadly. It’s not just a thing of the past, either. Scurvy still shows up in developing nations, and dozens of cases were reported in the United States in the last decade. Thankfully, it is relatively easy to treat — all you need is a high dose of Vitamin C. But here’s the…

  • Why Are There No Sea Snakes in the Atlantic?
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    Why Are There No Sea Snakes in the Atlantic?

    Thanks to Brilliant for supporting this episode of SciShow. Go to Brilliant.org/SciShow to learn more. [INTRO ♪] Sea snakes are the most common group of marine reptiles in the entire ocean, with almost seventy individual species. But despite their impressive diversity, none of them live in the Atlantic Ocean. Which is weird, and also nice! There’s a whole ocean with no snakes in it! But also there’s an entire ocean of snake food and living space out there, so what’s going on? The answer lies in their evolution, their biology, and a weirdly “dry” part of the ocean. The first reason is deceptively simple: modern sea snakes didn’t evolve in…

  • 4 Parasites Too Creepy to Exist
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    4 Parasites Too Creepy to Exist

    Thanks to Brilliant for supporting this whole week of SciShow! Go to Brilliant.org/SciShow to learn more. [♪ INTRO] Of all the strategies life has developed for survival, parasitism is among the most popular. A parasite is an organism that makes its living taking resources from another, called the host. Parasites give nothing back and often harm the host in the process. Scientists have estimated that anywhere between ⅓ and ½ of all life on Earth is parasitic, although there’s still a lot we don’t understand. What we do know is that the unique challenges and opportunities that come with parasitism have led to the evolution of some truly strange and…

  • Scientists Pull RNA from a 14,000 Year-Old Wolf | SciShow News
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    Scientists Pull RNA from a 14,000 Year-Old Wolf | SciShow News

    [intro] In a new study published this week in the journal PLOS Biology, molecular biologists describe something unbelievable: the sequence of the oldest RNA discovered to date. This RNA is estimated to be a little over fourteen thousand years old. Its very existence challenges the long-held belief that ancient RNA just isn’t a thing. And it suggests there could be lots of RNA waiting to be discovered in ancient remains. Now, fourteen thousand years might not sound that impressive. After all, a couple of years ago, scientists were able to sequence the entire genome of a seven hundred thousand year-old horse. But that was DNA—the molecular blueprint inside cells. And…

  • 6 ways mushrooms can save the world | Paul Stamets
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    6 ways mushrooms can save the world | Paul Stamets

    I love a challenge, and saving the Earth is probably a good one. We all know the Earth is in trouble. We have now entered in the 6X, the sixth major extinction on this planet. I often wondered, if there was a United Organization of Organisms — otherwise known as “Uh-Oh” — (Laughter) — and every organism had a right to vote, would we be voted on the planet, or off the planet? I think that vote is occurring right now. I want to present to you a suite of six mycological solutions, using fungi, and these solutions are based on mycelium. The mycelium infuses all landscapes, it holds soils…