• The Internet: Crash Course Computer Science #29
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    The Internet: Crash Course Computer Science #29

    Hi, I’m Carrie Anne, and welcome to CrashCourse Computer Science! As we talked about last episode, your computer is connected to a large, distributed network, called The Internet. I know this because you’re watching a youtube video, which is being streamed over that very internet. It’s arranged as an ever-enlarging web of interconnected devices. For your computer to get this video, the first connection is to your local area network, or LAN, which might be every device in your house that’s connected to your wifi router. This then connects to a Wide Area Network, or WAN, which is likely to be a router run by your Internet Service Provider, or…

  • Web Development: Intro to Web Lab
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    Web Development: Intro to Web Lab

    My name is Mei’lani. I’m a curriculum development intern here at Code.org and I’m also a computer science student at Cascadia College. I always liked the fact that I can make whatever I want with computer science. I’ve been able to make really cool websites that are about topics and really passionate about. And I just really enjoyed that there’s so many different ways to express myself through such an outlet. Websites are everywhere and they’re the primary way many people get their news, keep up with friend’s activities, learn new information and share the details of their lives. Right now, you might be a consumer of websites created by…

  • The World Wide Web: Crash Course Computer Science #30
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    The World Wide Web: Crash Course Computer Science #30

    Hi, I’m Carrie Anne, and welcome to CrashCourse Computer Science. Over the past two episodes, we’ve delved into the wires, signals, switches, packets, routers and protocols that make up the internet. Today we’re going to move up yet another level of abstraction and talk about the World Wide Web.This is not the same thing as the Internet, even though people often use the two terms interchangeably in everyday language. The World Wide Web runs on top of the internet, in the same way that Skype, Minecraft or Instagram do. The Internet is the underlying plumbing that conveys the data for all these different applications. And The World Wide Web is…

  • Secrets of the Deep Dark Web (Deep Dark Web Pt2) – Computerphile
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    Secrets of the Deep Dark Web (Deep Dark Web Pt2) – Computerphile

    [Dr. Wilson] So let’s now start talking about what is the deep web. Because your web server can say a few things. As well as saying “here’s your page” it can also say “I don’t know what that page is.” So if I say… Can we go to “nottingham.ac.uk/freeStuffForMax”? It goes: I’m sorry I don’t know what that is. Page not found. We don’t have “free stuff for max”. It can also say you’re not allowed to go there. So it can say if I want to go to “nottingham.ac.uk/hr/increaseMySalary.html” It will say “sorry you can’t go there” that’s a bit of the web you’re not allowed to see and…

  • Web vs Internet (Deep Dark Web Pt1) – Computerphile
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    Web vs Internet (Deep Dark Web Pt1) – Computerphile

    So we’re gonna talk about the difference between the web, the internet, the dark web, and the deep web but in order to talk about all of these things and figure out why they’re different we need to start with the basics of the web and the internet because most people confuse those as well as confusing the deep web and the dark web and how they’re different and we’re just gonna try and figure all that out today – how they’re separate so we’ll start off with the internet what is the internet versus the web? The internet is the physical connection of all the computers that are joined…

  • Almost All Web Encryption Works Like This (SP Networks) – Computerphile
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    Almost All Web Encryption Works Like This (SP Networks) – Computerphile

    Let’s talk a little bit about encryption and specifically kind of modern encryption and how it works Now before we jump straight into something like the advanced encryption standard. I wanted to talk about SP networks or Substitution-Permutation networks because they are the basis for a lot of modern cryptography — not all of it, but a lot of symmetric cryptography anyway. Dave has done a lot of videos on things like Enigma. Enigma is a kind of classic cipher and it’s a substitution cipher. Just like the Caesar cipher. It’s just that its substitution is a little bit better than the Caesar cipher so with something like Enigma or the Caesar…

  • The dark side of the web — exploring darknets | Kyle Terry | TEDxSalem
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    The dark side of the web — exploring darknets | Kyle Terry | TEDxSalem

    Reviewer: Queenie Lee The term “darknet” was coined in the 70s, and it was meant as a way to describe networks isolated from ARPANET. ARPANET eventually became the commercial internet run by the private telecoms we all use today. ARPANET was created by the US Department of Defense, and it was created to share data about their projects in research laboratories, with the universities. And for those of you familiar with networking, it was a first packet-switching Network, which is the foundation to modern networking. Now, we’re not talking about the World Wide Web here. That didn’t show up until 1990, when Tim Berners-Lee set up the first web server…

  • Utility Computing – Georgia Tech – Advanced Operating Systems
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    Utility Computing – Georgia Tech – Advanced Operating Systems

    Now, if we peak inside the black box however, we find that it is not just Bala who is using the resources in the virtual platform, but there is also Piero and there is also Kim, and possibly others who are also running their own applications. Their own operating system on the same shared hardware resources. Why would we want to do this? Well, unless we are quite unlucky, the hope is that sharing hardware resources across several different user communities is going to result in making. The cost of ownership and maintenance of the shared resources, much cheaper. The fundamental intusion that makes sharing hardware resources across the diverse…

  • Artificial general intelligence: The domain of the patient, philosophical coder | Ben Goertzel
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    Artificial general intelligence: The domain of the patient, philosophical coder | Ben Goertzel

    My cousin who lives in Hong Kong is a game programmer, and he loves what I’m doing but he just tells me when we discuss it, “I need immediate gratification.” And he codes something and he sees a game character do something cool, right? And if you need that, if you really need to see something cool happen every day AGI is not for you. In AGI you may work six months and nothing interesting happens. And then something really interesting happens. So I think if someone doesn’t have that kind of stubborn, pigheaded persistence I will tend to employ them doing, for example, data analysis, because that gives immediate…