Biosecurity in Our Backyard – Hosted by Costa – High School
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Biosecurity in Our Backyard – Hosted by Costa – High School


historically strong quarantine measures and geographic isolation coupled with world-class research have protected Australia from some of the most serious impacts posed by exotic pests and diseases that are circulating around the world but our enviable biosecurity status is increasingly threatened by growing connections to the world through global trade the movement of plants animals and people across the globe and by the uncertain impacts of climate change we no longer have the luxury of relative isolation as we face an unpredictable and interconnected biosecurity environment biosecurity is about the management of risks to our health economy industries and environment from pests and pathogens entering spreading or establishing in Australian waters or on our soil through a proud history of biosecurity research CSIRO has made a significant contribution to Australia’s biosecurity status we’ve diagnosed devastating pests and pathogens in plants and animals and responded quickly to limit negative impacts during emergencies designed integrated strategies to manage invasive pests in agriculture developed and evaluated important vaccines and therapeutics and delivered biological control for invasive animals and many exotic weeds that are found in production landscapes and the wider environment the CSIRO biosecurity flagship builds on these successes bringing scale and connectivity to help Australia prevent prepare for and respond to the spread and impacts of pests and diseases we’re achieving this by working across the biosecurity continuum investigating risks offshore at the border and monitoring what is happening in our own backyard and we’re exploring social sciences and smart technologies for detection surveillance response and diagnosis in the last 20 years a staggering 70% of emerging infectious diseases in people have been found to have originated in animals we’re taking an integrated approach across human and animal health ecology and environmental science commonly called one health to understand how these viruses spread between wild animals livestock and people and how to reduce the risks or be prepared for rapid response in a human pandemic situation our expertise places us in a leading position to investigate major biosecurity issues now and in the future we care about high quality science that delivers impact for Australia and by continuing to partner with government industry universities and other international agencies we can make a difference and protect the health of our people economy industries and environment from biosecurity threats get a girls and guys teachers everyone around New South Wales I’m Kosta and good afternoon from here at the beautiful homestead associated with tow Cal College in the Hunter Valley now I just want to set the scene here this barn is over a hundred and fifty years old but we’re able to come to you at your schools using technology not from the 1850s but technology that’s bringing us together in 2018 and these are some of the themes that I want to share with you across this session because this is going to touch on potential career opportunities career opportunities that you’re going to be able to tap into from today I’m not talking about grabbing hold of your phone and getting on Sikh and saying I want a job I’m talking about getting into stuff that you are passionate about and you’re going to meet people that are madly passionate about what they do they don’t even call it work they just do it so I want to thank you all for tuning in and I’m looking forward to a great discussion about biosecurity so looking around I can see you down there in inver ill give me a wave in Varela and evans river fowler memorial a guy can see you over there on the top right Cole Hawthorn give me a wave what about lightning ridge wow you guys are a long way from us in in Newcastle welcome lightning ridge give us a wave kanopolis rural tech and kanopolis high school you’re both with us and Gary Kemp see coughs duh buh I can see someone in double and even someone in cooler anyway a big welcome to you all it’s great to be here and first off here’s a biosecurity challenge for you have a look at this it’s a picture from my own Instagram account that desperately I mean just give it a caption over the next 40 minutes you’ll get some inspiration and I’ll check back in a little later to see how your creativity is going okay now listen in all of us can do really simple things to be biosecurity aware like making sure that things like the hats t-shirts and shoes that a lot of us buy online these days are coming from reputable traders oh Kuster big deal whoo so what well here’s the drum invasive pests as we all know can hide inside packaging and boxes padded parcels and materials made of plant fiber wood and fabric we might be geographically isolated from the world as an island down here in the south this has played a key role in making sure we have a great biosecurity track record but let’s face it two months after you win the grand final no one’s talking about it anymore they’re looking ahead so however we move and with international travel these days there increases and the risks are only getting bigger so think about it do your research before you buy and check out the DPI website for little tips and tricks on what you can do to keep anything suspicious out of the country your little purchase could have massive consequences now if you did find any suspicious eggs or soil or a dead bug in a package from overseas don’t just throw it out into the recycling or into the bin you need to report it by calling the exotic plant pest hotline or take a clear photo of the pests and email it to the DPI key point you’re not going to get into trouble Australia’s in the fortunate situation of being free of many significant pests that can adversely affect our agricultural production and other countries aren’t free of them so if we want to keep this reputation we’ve got to protect it and just think about it it’s the world that you’re going to inherit so if we can all work together we’ll make a difference and to keep it this way biosecurity officers think about this now this is pretty full tilt intercepted and handled three hundred and forty thousand potential buyers security breaches last year if there’s 365 days in a year that’s almost a thousand breaches every day so sooner or later one of those is going to stick and we’re going to have to pay for it a hundred and twenty thousand of them were from Sydney Airport alone there’s a massive mail centre there where a lot of things come in two and fifty thousand think about this fifty thousand of them were intercepted by the dogs some of the confiscated items wait for this included duck tongues chicken feet cooked eggs what about a barbecued rat where’d you get that online lizards feet and steamed frogs can’t say I’ve had a skinned one any of these items could have been carrying deadly pests or disease any of these items could have decimated our environment just with one little step Wildlife farms produce everything could have been impacted they could have threatened human life as well now while we’re talking about imported pests check these beasties out I’d like to introduce you to Nathan cutter he’s a technical specialist vertebrate pests with the New South Wales dpi and our snake handler Rob Ambrose – tell us a little bit about this American corn snake and what impact it could have on our native wildlife yeah Kosta the American corn snake is a medium-sized slender snake that can grow up to 180 centimeters high so as high as Rabia and they because they’ve been bred by the international pet industry they come in a variety of colors from blacks here to yellows to oranges to even this albino snake here it’s pretty wildly out there no one yeah they can sometimes make the American corn snake difficult to identify just because of the different color and scale variations so effectively you’re talking about a whole lot of different well the same breed but a snake being bred to look interesting be appealing as a pet but there’s some serious consequences isn’t it yeah that’s right yeah it’s been trafficked around the world by people selling them as pets when the pet snakes get out or escape they become established in the wild and this can lead to devastating effects on the native wildlife we don’t want the same thing happening in New South Wales or in Australia at all so it’s illegal for anyone other than zoos and research facilities to keep the American cornsnake in Australia now Rob my little buddy he’s getting to know me pretty pretty well why is it illegal to keep exotic snakes well exotic snakes are potentially very invasive and we don’t want another corn snake Oh another cool thing another cane toad I should say you know on another cane toad these things escape easily and people let them go even and they can establish wild populations we definitely don’t want that to happen so effectively what you’re saying is with more and more of these animals coming into the country it’s not a matter of if they’re going to cause a problem it’s a matter of when definitely we see a lot of evidence of them in people’s backyards and people have them and some people even let them go yeah they don’t want them anymore yeah yeah you just lose interest a bit like a cat or a dog just taking it down to local park and letting it go now Nathan what should you do if you were to see an American corn snake or know of someone who has one cost if anyone sees one of these in the open environment we’d like them to take out their phone and to take a picture and send it to dpi we can use the information in the photo and contact the person who sent that to us and we can determine what actions to take to mitigate their the problem we normally get an expert to come out and pick the snake up if you know of anyone who has one it can be surrendered to a vet it should be surrendered to a vet and you should never ever release them into the open environment or into the bush they they can if they if they are let out they can threaten our native wildlife and that’s something that we don’t want as Rob said we don’t want another cane toad in Australia now what sort of an impact do they have once there once they’re released on our native wildlife so evidence from other countries has shown that they have a devastating impact on native wildlife they target so they’re a a predatory snake and they target other snakes they target frogs lizards mammals and they even get into birds nests and target the little birds so they can take out our our our Birds as well so they’re very good climbers and they’re fantastic burrow is very difficult to find once they’re out there oh wait I think I let him go cause I don’t agree of biosecurity risk yeah yeah Jake he’s sort of moving into sea on the belly there the reason that they’re caught the corn snake is that row of row of corn like scales it actually does look like corn well Nathan and Rob thanks for coming in and telling us a little bit about the challenges of snakes and and the biosecurity threat that they pose thanks heaps guys great thanks now to ensure that we have eyes everywhere the DPI have 64 drone pilots each and every pilot is collecting data which protects our treasured landscapes our precious ecosystems our agriculture industry wildlife and our water supply now these drone ranges fly a range of missions relating to sea life soil plant health fire prevention crop and bush management wait for it these are some of the things that a drone operator is looking into illegal hunting and clearing shark tracking and fishing and general surveillance the data collected on each drone mission helps marine biologists and scientists to know how to maintain our natural resources I want to tell you a really interesting story because biosecurity work is a combination of science and detective work but the most important point with it is the data because the data helps us to understand something as simple as currents imagine if we got a water bottle there somewhere zero and got a water bottle throw it over a group outside of Port Douglas called Tenga royal blue we’re doing their regular weekly beach cleanup and a whole lot of the the people just like you boys and girls just like me that go along they get on a boat and they walk along these beaches and they find waist up beyond Port Douglas that’s coming currents from Newcastle and Wollongong this is the impact of us using single-use products they don’t just go away after we’ve finished with them anyway they found about 350 water bottles like this on one stretch of beach what they do is go straight for the data and go for this code and say where was it made they found that it was Vietnamese what they then did was contact Coast watch who put that data into their current mapping and it said ok on that day or around that time the currents were coming from here and the beach was there they then went to border security and border security sent a boat out there now wait for this so the data that they collected so it’s not about I well I don’t we feel good pat ourselves on the back we’re cleaning up someone’s waste no we’ve got to go the next step and get the data they got the data they sent that through the system border security went out there guess what they found they found six illegal Vietnamese fishing boats because those bottles looked brand new which made people think let’s check this information six illegal fishing boats had been fishing there for over six weeks and what were they doing every time they finished their water bottle they were throwing it out and they left a clue most people ask any detective there’s clues and that’s where this whole buyers security broadcasts that we’re talking about today is all about bringing these clues together learning doesn’t matter which area it is whether it’s into that the sea or whether it’s on the land we can do this imagine floating nets not only they pollute waterways but they carry invasive mussel species which hitch a ride and then jump off and spread into our waterways now so effective other drones at giving us eyes in the sky the DPI the department of primary industry have invested four hundred and thirty thousand dollars to turn a drone ranger into a lifesaver imagine this on a training mission in January this year just down at lennox head this device known as the little ripper became the first drone in the world to save lives by dropping an inflatable device down to swimmers caught in a rip these lifesavers were quite a distance away by the time they would have jumped on to their their ATV on to their quad bike and got there those two kids would have probably drowned but they were able to drop this down there the children were able to swim to shore by the time they got to shore the lifesavers arrived it was such a compelling video that it reached over 200 million people people sorry I’m spitting I’m getting that excited about it because this is the potential that each and every one of you boys and girls are sitting on as far as opportunities for your careers into the future brand new data helps with future planning and when we combine science with traditional knowledge think about it stories from our indigenous elders who have passed on the story of the landscape their eyes have been watching it for decades and centuries so when something small changes they’ve got something’s wrong now we have this technology where we can seek changes in the landscape by mapping and by photographing and then we can take that data and do something with it and that excites me so it’s time to meet this afternoon’s biosecurity expert dr. Sara Britton who the acting chief veterinary officer in group director of animal biosecurity and welfare for New South Wales Sarah is going to introduce us to some of the ways that the New South Wales dpi protect us from pests diseases and weeds now when it comes to prevention preparation response and recovery there are a lot of people involved so keep your eye on a role that you think you might be interested in the future can you put your hands together for Sarah please thanks Custer welcome Sarah come on in look at look at the schools give us a wave in burrell go Evan’s Evan’s River I can see you there there’s a couple of you and I think I saw someone down here at where was it was it lightning Rachel kanopolis someone out of 40 I was gonna I know it was kanopolis one of the boys in the front row had a foot he passed me the ball buddy come on why so Sarah tell me a little bit about what biosecurity means and you know where where it all fits in for you thanks Kosta well probably for most people biosecurity people think about Border Patrol and they always think about what stops at the border but it’s actually much much bigger than that so it actually starts in your backyard so you guys you might not be aware of it but you’re actually all biosecurity warriors and you’re doing a role out there right now so you might be actually weeding your garden you might be looking after your chucks and making sure that birds don’t get in all sorts of things that you could be doing that you’re actually doing biosecurity and it’s really important that you all have a play space in this play we do this properly anyway in this space so that we can all work together because we can’t do it alone now you’ve abbreviated it into a couple of simple letters so that people can appreciate the process can you explain that a little so what we end up doing is the four peas and the two hours so what we do is we protect we prevent we predict and we prepare we respond and we help you with recovery and all of these parts everyone’s involved in that and it involves many many people from right from you and your backyards right through to the Commonwealth government right through to all sorts of people that help in every part of that stage now there’s a few examples that you can share with us to explain to each and every one of the boys and girls at the biosecurity is not just some freaky word that sounds a bit high-tech and way distance from way distant from me that it actually impacts us right down to the dollars and cents that we may spend on different things can you can you give us a couple of those examples sure so when we had white spot up in Queensland what happened we found that the price of prawns went right up when we had banana freckle up in Northern Territory we couldn’t get bananas it was very difficult to get them when we had a qualm influenza in New South Wales you couldn’t move your horse around couldn’t take to the show or wherever and when we had red imported fire ants in Queensland and in Port Botany again that impacted your back yards you couldn’t go out and probably enjoy the barbecues and those things that you’d like to do yeah because there was these little mongrel red ants that you know no no sooner sat down that just jump up and give you like a serious bite that you felt for quite a while didn’t you yeah really nasty little critters and that came in on a container or a ship and and and the thing with the prawns you know you think oh yeah there’s some white spot going on in the prawns up in Queensland but what that does is affect the whole market because the supply goes down and suddenly anyone wanting to buy prawns it’s going to be a hundred and twenty hundred fifty dollars a kilo saying the same with the bananas when they went from three dollars a kilo to twenty two dollars a kilo this this is the reality isn’t it exactly yep these things they impact you you might be in the city you might be elsewhere but it has an effect on everybody in New South Wales and around Australia so I understand that it’s an exciting part of your job but how can people contribute to this process so one of the good things that you guys can do is if you see anything unusual something that’s not right then you can reimagine sea animal disease hotline which 1867 five trip away and we also have an emergency plant hotline which was mentioned earlier in the video yeah now you’ve mentioned a few pests and diseases how many more investigations to you and the DPI team look into so just last year just in animals alone animal investigations we just did under two thousand animal disease investigations with our partner local Land Services and with our other partners our private veterinary practitioners we did over 3,000 animal disease investigations well so there’s a lot of people working in biosecurity a huge number when you actually look at the spectrum of jobs that are available in biosecurity we have GIS mappers we have people that work in IT we have data interrogators and collectors we have rural resilience officers we have people that work in recovery we have teachers we have vets we have agronomist we have researchers pathologist drone operators lawyers yeah it really does go on and on and on yep it’s huge so there’s a job for everybody in biosecurity and one of the things you’re doing is protecting us and the community and the economy and doing making sure that we’ve got food on the table so everyone can make a difference exactly well Sara thanks for your insight and input and I really appreciate you were sharing some time with all the students today thanks Kirsten okay Sara now here’s one for you did you know that a farm fence is actually a biosecurity border the fences that you see when you’re driving through the country protect our food security by making sure that no unwanted disease makes its way onto our commercial farms so think about if you’re driving along and you want to take a selfie in a field of you know golden canola or or maybe sunflowers stop and think for a second think of the farmers first not your in-store account because you can still get your selfie but the only difference is don’t cross the fence with potentially a whole lot of stuff on your boot you could be carrying invasive pests and it only needs to be one little weed seed or some little bacteria that could be living in a bit of the squash cow poo that you then deliver there as you trip through the barbed wire and tread on a couple of plants and give it a nice little wipe admire the crops from the road and that’s kind of a little hot tip so hola while I’m at it I’ll just do a selfie of the screen say can you see that’s what I’m seeing down there so I can see all you girls and boys at your different schools anyway I’ll put that down and we’ll carry on right now we’re about to hear from some biosecurity officers who are keeping the Sydney fruit markets safe from biosecurity threats let’s check it out [Music] the market operations start around 3 o’clock in the morning you can imagine where everyone is sound asleep this market is just buzzing with life an active bee hive we have around 400 growers that supply regularly the market would produce approximately 140 agents so you can imagine it’s a huge huge operations here it’s one of the biggest markets in the world approximately 3 million tons of produce are exchanged here in the markets every year you can imagine extra hub for Australia the biggest and everything is distributed here to the other states from Sydney markets so our role is crucial as we make sure that every produce comes into Sydney or everything that exported to the other state complies the requirements and with the legalities of the other states our main aim is to keep the minimum of the spread manifestation of pests and disease and the main the other main issue of our presidency in the markets is to enforce the traceability of produce where it came from I was going to in case there was an outbreak of an exotic disease or an outbreak of a pest we can’t control and we can see where it’s done and stop the spread day we depend on the the pathologist and the department to make sure that we are secure in what is happening out there on the field our reputation is on the line here that if we give something to the consumer which is not a hundred percent it comes back to bite us so we need to make sure that whatever we we’ve sent out is secure and there’s no issues and working with with the growers and the Department gives us that security that in the long run we hope that everything’s 100% fresh produce group is one of Australia’s largest and most innovative fresh budget suppliers we bring products from around the world to Australia to supply to Australian consumers we supply mostly through Australia’s major retailers but we’re also an exporter so we export products from our farms and farms of our suppliers to a range of destinations around the world particularly into Asia both security is important to our business because it maintains access for us it’s what keeps those doors open for us the trade in those markets in which we’re active so we also understand that in our farms that we must manage biosecurity right in order for us to maintain access to our export customers on imported product we need that biosecurity to be able to move product from interstate to make sure that we’re not spreading any pest or disease issues the effects of a biosecurity event on our business would be for a period of time until that was resolved would shut down that supply chain we would not be able to service the needs of our customers and our suppliers would be blocked from having market access supply programs and consumers not having access to the product for our suppliers it would mean major financial impacts on their businesses have been closed out from the market so it’s important for us to ensure that all our supply partners understand the importance of biosecurity and we each play our role in maintaining that security across our supply chain fire security is a shared responsibility where everyone has a role to play good biosecurity practices means keeping the impact of pests and disease to the minimum which means less use of pesticides which has a great positive effect on the environment and the health of people the stand over the quality of the produce where people can trust we have a very very high stand and very high reputation worldwide of our fresh produce we’re striving to keep it this way and we shall keep it this way [Music] we’re back again and how good is this view I feel really privileged to have spent the day here today I I came out early in the morning and the old barn out the back was beautifully lit same yesterday afternoon and I took some photos and did a little bit of a an insta Live and lots of people came on and and just enjoyed the landscape that we’re in and the reality is if we want to keep it we’ve got to work for it because the threats of biosecurity are only going to get bigger and bigger and that’s why this broadcast today is about getting you girls and boys clued up from your age so that you become part of the solution not part of the problem now if any of you ever get the chance to visit the sydney fruit markets you should it’s a high energy market full of great produce and people who have been trading there for generations our second guest today is Rebecca Pearce Rebecca is a plant biosecurity officer based in orange who originally worked in the nursery and cut flower industry now sending plants across Australia made her super aware of the state’s biosecurity guidelines in relation to pests and disease threats today she’s going to talk to us about the biosecurity steps needed to prevent and manage pests and disease in fruit can you put your hands together for Rebecca thanks Costa hey everyone I hope you’re all doing really well yeah so I don’t know how many of you realize but our fruit and veggies actually travel a really long way often before they get to places like the Sydney market so our supermarkets across the nation so for example we talked about bananas before 97% of all bananas produced in Australia come from Queensland so effectively what Rebecca’s saying is that they all come from Queensland except for a few backyard gardeners that probably grow a few and a few people that are growing them in the former growing areas like Coffs Harbour and you know that couldn’t compete yeah and so that 97% most of them are then being sent all across Australia so that everyone has bananas to eat and that’s why if there is a problem we find that we were talking about it before that sometimes you feel that supermarket and where you can’t get bananas or they become really expensive so biosecurity isn’t only important but it’s really important for stuff being sent around Australia’s four different states and regions as well so our growers really need to make sure that they’re not spreading pests and diseases when they move stuff now is so many different types of produce and so many pests to keep track of how do our growers make sure that they’re not spreading these pests yeah well our growers actually have a really big job to do and they’re constantly following biosecurity controls to make sure that pests and diseases aren’t moved with their fruit and vegetables so for example fruit fly I’m pretty sure you’ve all heard of fruit fly and you may have even got gone on a family trip or you’ve had to stop at a border to drop off some fruit or something or when you come into the country you have to drop off your fruit if you’ve come back from a holiday because the fruit fly larvae and maggots are actually really tiny and then inside the fruit so you can’t see it from the outside and so nobody wants that then visibly being moved across and introducing a new fruit fly to a new state or a new region it’s interesting isn’t it because who’s who’s traveled by air around Australia and you get as you’re coming in to land the pilot comes on and says off yeah thanks for putting your hands up I can see you there down in conneautville us and a few other schools that the pilot comes on and says you know there’s there’s bends there as as a place to put your fruit and/or vegetable think I look that looks all clean and okay oh it doesn’t really matter or oops I forgot to do it but for any of you that have grown fruit who’s growing fruit and you think it’s all ready to go everything’s fine and then you open it up and it’s full of you know it’s been it’s been punctured by the fruit fly and it’s full of worms disgusting and so that that that’s why it is serious every piece of fruit matters because each piece of fruit becomes a vehicle yeah and so then if we’re doing that on you know off chance that we’re going across a border or coming on a holiday our growers are doing that all the time because they are constantly sending fruit around the country fruit and vegetables around the country so sticking with a fruit fly example our growers either have to fumigate that fruit with methyl bromide these are just a couple of the things they can choose from cold treat the fruit at really low temperatures or irradiate the fruit with gamma radiation and these measures will then make sure that anything that is inside the fruit will be killed and so when it gets to its new destination they can’t live and grow up and you know turn into flies make their own babies and then all of a sudden you’ve got a different fruit fly in a new state yeah so what we’re talking about here guys and girls he’s breaking the cycle because if we can break the cycle on the farm then the producers don’t have to use a whole series of chemicals but this is a big challenge and it has to take place over multiple seasons to break the the larvae and the breeding cycle and and if we can do that all together and not leave fruit in the street not leave fruit under trees in your backyard we can help our farmers to change all of these challenges that you are looking at yeah so our girls are doing a really big job hmm now I I see I see the challenges of biosecurity everywhere I go and it sounds like a lot of hard work why is it so important that we stop these pests from spreading well using one industry as an example so our citrus industry they’re the largest fresh produce exporting industry in the whole of Australia and New South Wales alone produces over 210 million kilos of citrus fruit valued at a hundred and eighty million dollars a year so there’s a lot of livelihoods in that money absolutely and so you can see why it’s really important to have strict biosecurity controls to protect citrus fruit and other industries like it from new pests and diseases so that’s their mistakes girls and guys they’re big stakes that we’re talking about so Rebecca thanks for sharing these take on by securities for having me everyone round of applause for a Rebecca place absolute treat okay now back to the captions how are those biosecurity captions coming along here’s the photo again so if you’ve got a caption jot that caption down and pass it to your teacher we’ve given your teacher a number to text them through to us as I said earlier my hot tip is to make it about something that has really stood out for you today chicken head beard biosecurity B’s fruit fruit flies there’s plenty of images that you can mess with and remember that with images it’s about the story and it’s about getting the engagement and you got to get people to look right there an engagement is a great challenge and for those of you that are getting into things like video and storytelling and blogs it’s all about engagement now I’d like to cross live to kanopolis rural technology High School in orange for some questions and you can also send in your questions so tell your teacher to text any of the questions that you’ve got into this number oh four one nine eight double to double O eight O four one nine eight double to double O eight so we’re going to go to the questions kanopolis hi are they coming on live yes we are yeah I can hear I can see I can say you’re South’s fully there I think well there’s plenty of possible threats but I’ll go with the first one that comes to mind the bumble bee now the bumble bee looks like an interesting character in as a cartoon character but if it comes into Australia it poses an massive threat now the DPI sent out this be alert and the post reached over a quarter of a million people with 5,000 shares people loved bees they want to protect their bees if we want to protect our native bees we need to understand that the bumble bee poses a threat it pollinates weed species which our native bees aren’t necessarily inclined to do they also operate at lower temperature and travel further distances and what that means is they get up earlier get the pollen and that way our bees suffer and could decline so that’s just a few reasons of why we don’t want bumble bees around so if you spot one and there were some spotted up in Cairns and the department jumped on it and so far it’s been controlled but it can only be controlled with lots of eyes and there’s not enough officers out there to do it but there’s lots of us punters so we got to get out there and do it what’s your next question okay so that one look the varroa mite the varroa mite is another threat to our bees okay now it’s an interesting one because once that gets in what happens it’s a it’s a microscopic it’s a microscopic virus that gets in and it attaches to the the bee but it also goes in and attacks the larvae and when it does that what it does is it weakens the whole colony and if it weakens the colony then the bees don’t go out as far to collect pollen and and nectar and if they don’t do that and they’re losing they’re losing the larvae back in the hive effectively the hive grounds to a halt and it dies and the most important control for that is vigilance again it’s really funny because we talk about in this world about all the positive it’ll things but a lot of the biosecurity challenges and solutions are actually us getting out there using these two things and like the elders for centuries watching picking up a change subtle differences really subtle and going I smell a problem here so yeah honeybees play an essential role in agriculture not only producing honey and beeswax but also pollinating a vast number of our food crops so let’s take a look at some biosecurity measures protecting the honeybee industry check this out Australia’s honeybees are some of the healthiest in the world free from many of the pests and diseases found elsewhere Australia’s honeybee biosecurity system plays a crucial role in protecting the health of our honeybees honeybee biosecurity is a set of measures designed to protect your honeybees see biosecurity is important to Australia because of the significant of bee and the industries in which they support but not only that the industry itself which has highly productive and unique which needs to be safeguarded every beekeeper whether you own one hive or a thousand and every person visiting or working in an apiary has a role to play in protecting honeybees from established in exotic pests a healthy population of honeybees ensures the success of the honeybee industry and the many plant industries that rely on them for pollination every pest or disease that enters and becomes established in an apiary has the potential to increase the costs for additional monitoring chemical use and labour colony yield and performance may decrease and valuable markets particularly overseas may be lost there are six easy ways to protect your honeybees you should be aware of the key pests and diseases present in Australia such as small hive beetle American foul brood or Nosema these can affect the strength and productivity of colonies and require constant management when inspecting your hives always be on the lookout for these established pest and other pests that might be new to the country there’s more information about pests and what to look for in your biosecurity manual try to make sure that any new beef stock or equipment is free from pests and disease by packaged and queen bees from trusted ape resources that are preferably certified within one month of arrival check to see that the new stock is reproducing by looking for new brood cells keep details of all a pre inputs such as the suppliers name and the delivery date so you can track where pests may have come from well one of the rules of the AAP here is that we don’t bring any gear in we only use hive tools smokers gloves that is actually located on site and we make sure that every time we go out of the a pre that if the if the hive tools got propolis and wax and honey on it that all gets a hot scrub and wash so that if there’s anything on one hive that’s a bit suspicious you don’t move that gear the next time many pests and diseases can be transferred into clean a Perez via honey beekeeping equipment and boxes and utensils such as hand tools using good hygiene will prevent the entry and the spread of pests within and between a Parisse workers business vehicles and equipment can all spread pests so make sure they are clean before entering and leaving the apiary [Music] okay girls and guys welcome back I’ve shifted out of the barn you’ve probably got a bit of a view of the outside of it now and I’m here with beekeeper rod now rod can you tell me a little bit about your title and what you do when it comes to beaky okay castle on the bee biosecurity officer with New South Wales department of primary industry and I generally help mostly commercial beekeepers with their disease and biosecurity issues as well as amateur beekeepers – and how long have you been a mad beekeeper for since I was this big Wow really yeah well who introduced you to it Oh my father he got me stung me I was a baby when he brought home some bees and that’s it baby get stung with an idea and with a passion and then when that sting stays with you and it becomes your job yeah that’s that’s it well yeah is it a job that’s my question that on the house fashion it’s a passion it’s unreal what do you need to think about when it comes to looking after beehives like this well they need good flowers and plants so you put them in a good location where there are a lot of different trees and shrubs and veggies excited a lot of pollination and they need the pollen so effectively girls and guys what I want you to think about is if we want happy healthy bees they need flowers so that they can do their job and get their feed but it’s not just spring spring is not just when flowers come into bloom we need to think about getting flowers across the whole year so from September to November from from March till June from June till August from August till December from December to April from February to August and that way if we’ve got flowers a whole year round then your bees are going to be happy okay yep and you also got to check the bird in a beehive regularly at least twice a year now you come across problems with these can you explain what what you should do to check the brood I favor for diseased beekeepers like smoked smoked very important some baked eaters are only worried about the honey – then that’s the most important thing but that’s not everything this is where the most important part of bee hive is this is where the bird is if you got sick babies got sick food and you’ll find that when you do a bird inspection in your beehive so what is American foul brood and how does it affect the hive well American foul brood is a disease that is picked up by young bees have just hatched from the egg that the Queen has laid if I get fed some AFB spores six boys is enough for a young baby larvae they will get sick and when they die they’ll produce 2.6 billion spores and make the disease a lot worse and will affect the whole beehive Wow I mean that’s really serious kills and guys if you could hear the buzz and the hum I don’t know if there’s any beekeepers out there in the audience but but when rod lifted that out the bees were kind of not so he said is that a queen now this is drone oh it’s a drone it’s a big giant yep Wow so how do bees get the American foul brood where does it come well it’s it’s often found in honey so when a hive gets American foul bird the spores proliferate it gets into every aspect of the Beehive and then when the first hive dies from American foul brood other bee hives will come and Rob out the rest of the honey take it home feed it to their bees and then germinate them and it’s a domino effect and it gets bigger and bigger and it affects more and more beehives so what should you do if your hive gets something like American foul brood that sounds harsh but the best thing to do is to destroy that beehive and start with a clean colony of healthy bees and build it back up again that’s the only way to stop the disease from getting out and spreading to more be hoarse so effectively you have to take one for the team the team being the whole beekeeping industry everyone else was based from three or four kilometres away we’ll come to a dead out hive and get those spores and take them home so it starts here then it’s two kilometres away and then it’s two more kilometres away and it gets bigger and bigger and bigger now I reckon there’s potentially some budding hobby beekeepers out there what sort of equipment do you need to get started with the keeping well here’s your on my favorite smoker which as you can see that the sets might calm them down a lot got the gloves you’ve got the veil and the passion you need to learn all about the bees and once you’ve got those everything else will come naturally and you just keep on learning from the bees yeah and a passion alright I just want to follow up on that the passion does that get dispensed that down at the shops or the supermarket where do you get their passion it comes from here and then it keeps on working around your head what is it in the smoke that’s fantastic so you know what else do you need to do when you are a beekeeper what sort of responsibilities of course outside of the checking and the management and the health what other responsibilities do you have it’s crucial in New South Wales do you register with dpi as a beekeeper if you don’t register and you’ve got even a small baby beehive um it’s $1,000 fine for being unregistered which is the same as being registered with a lifetime 35 years you need to get registered we know where the beekeepers are we can communicate with beekeepers if there’s a biosecurity problem we can very quickly communicate with all the beekeepers in that area and let them know what’s going on and help to stop an exotic incursion or Varela instance getting away from a port in South Wales so in a sense it’s like someone driving an unregistered car with no brakes bald tires and they’re screeching down the road you’re perfectly registered and they could hit you and affect your livelihood by infecting it and destroying destroying your future unregistered beekeepers can ruin it for everyone else it’s your obligation to be registered well right I’m gonna disappear with a puff of smoke I’ll leave I’ll leave you two well if you go there your way just for my family to you Costa well that’s very hard thanks for your time rod I’m disappearing I’ll see you back in a minute everyone is a devastating brood disease of honeybees once a FB in facts a hive the hive will die a wait cord dead hive quickly exposes nearby bees to infection as healthy bees seek to rob the honey this honey carries spores of the bacterium which then established in the healthy hive and the disease cycle continues AFB alone is responsible for millions of dollars in lost productivity and can wreak havoc in areas where bee hives are poorly managed okay girls and guys I’m back it’s time for me to get out of this one of the good things about being in this role there’s sometimes people that will come and help so far they haven’t arrived but I will try and d0 much oh look at this fantastic now I wanted to make a correction boys and girls because when I was talking about varroa oh hang on we’ve got a problem Houston we’ve got a proton Oh him when I was talking about the varroa mite area I mentioned it the word virus it’s not actually a virus it’s what I actually called it a mite it’s a parasitic mite that comes into the hive it does two things it attaches itself to the bees and starts drawing energy from the bees but it also goes in and eats the larvae so I just wanted to correct that because I used one word at the beginning and then I used another word at the end so we’ll just make it clear varroa mite is a parasitic mite that comes in and weakens the strength of the hive all right well big thanks to rod but now we’re going to hear from the technical office of from laboratory services Angela Corcoran is who’s going to show us oh I think in Pharrell just burst in ice she’s going to show us the science behind collecting American fell brewed samples and processing them in the lab Angela is passionate about keeping disease out of Australia and here she is now Angela come on up we got all the students here can can you tell me about your job well I work in a branch of the DPI in the state veterinary diagnostic laboratory our purpose is to provide fast and reliable results for a range of testing and these include genetic testing samples for export and we get lots of samples from our local Land Services some of the tests that we test for the a2 in dairy cattle jános disease for cattle expert exports and AFB now how exactly do you test for AFB well we’re looking for the disease that causes the AFB disease which is a bacteria called penny bacillus larvae from the honey samples that we get we culture that on an agar plate or we also do a microscopic examination of spores from the brood from the hive now what do you find interesting about this work that you’re doing as a scientist what is really fantastic about where I work and what I work in is the fact that I work with research scientists who do experiments over and over again today and until they design a test for a specific disease and when they do that they pass it over to the diagnostic lab and we do that test for that specific disease and I’m when we do the tests we can get the results out to the farmers sometimes within 24 hours which is pretty amazing I mean that that information can get out there so quick yep well when it does get out there so quickly listen Able’s the farmers to treat their animals fast and that minimises the suffering and maximizes the production and of course contain any stops possible yep and it’s just great they’re fantastic people well well like how would you define what science means to you it’s that it’s just people doing discovering things and working for the farmers and it’s just it’s just mind-blowing what they do well Angela thank you for coming and and spraying your excitement and enthusiasm around science to all the street yeah I can see him there big round of applause for Angela thanks boys and girls now I mean even though we’ve got a screen here if you were standing here next to Angela you would see just how much she loves her work just as much as Rob loves his work out with the hives Angela is there in the lab helping Rob to make sure that any potential problems can be rectified so could you imagine yourselves as a Rob or an Angela or maybe a Nathan there’s so many or a Sarah there’s lots of there’s lots of little clues popping up here today about potential career pathways for each and every one of you now Briana Callum has a different side of the story once once the the tests are done Brianna Callum as education officer at Oh Cal College gets the information out there now thanks for joining us Briana welcome tell me a little bit about your role here at toque our College and how you keep the B community informed because information is really the most valuable key to the process isn’t it definitely so I’m an education officer here at Tokyo and the honey bee unit and my role is essentially to develop industry skills based training for people that are currently beekeepers or people that would like to start beekeeping and I guess our role in terms of communicating about AFP is basically to help people learn about the disease particularly those people that are working with bees but ultimately we want to train people how to identify it how to treat it and above all how to prevent the disease I saw on the news recently an interesting article about a queen bee breeding program what exactly is that all about so we’re starting a queen bee breeding program here at the college it’ll be one of the first ever pretty much in Australia I think also possibly in the world to check that one but essentially it’s going to be linked to our education program and we’re going to be helping the beef farmers of the future so its focus is gonna be on breeding Queens that healthier but bubble Queens that are definitely more productive and possibly resistant to more diseases and it’s very important because the queen is the mother to all the workers in the colony and she passes all her traits on to the 60,000 daughters in the hive 60,000 imagine sort of waking up in the morning and and sort of trying to get 60,000 60,000 members of your family out the door with their school bags and backpacks and and ready to go that’s pretty impressive so with all the students listening today what would be the one thing you’d like to let them know about bees and the work that you do so bees are super important we hear the message over and over again but I guess the biggest thing that I could try to communicate to you guys is without bees we don’t have a lot of the clothes that we wear we don’t have a lot of foods that we eat there are a lot of crops out there that slowly rely on bees so it’s really good to get involved in bees and if you want to become a beekeeper that’s awesome but above all go out there get as much training as you can and become a really good beekeeper one that’s qualified one that’s registered and I suppose even if you didn’t want to become a beekeeper you could be can be could become sorry that’s that’s almost a grandpa joke I’m sorry about that can we rate can we rewind that bit you could almost become just a contributor by growing a productive flower garden yeah definitely having a range of flowers in your garden but also if your summer lives in an area where there are beekeepers get involved you know you don’t have to have your own hive yourself you can join up with a bee club and learn you know learning is the tool and learning is the best cake Rhianna thanks heaps for your enthusiasm in your egg size thanks Brianna so today you’ve met a range of interesting biosecurity team members there are also so many other different roles but let’s give a round of applause for everyone who Jean dreamed up this project today and who are working very hard behind the scenes to bring all this fantastic information via satellite to your school big round of applause for everyone here that’s worked incredibly hard now in five minutes we’ll be announcing the winner of our caption competition but we’ll be accepting captions for two more minutes teachers this is the number you can send those captions 204 double one two four one seven six two we’ll need the caption the school and of course this student named our head of captions is standing by for those final entries there’s a desert job there’s a gig for you what are you going to do when you grow up I’m going to become a head of captions mum make them clever enough to become the new poster for biosecurity in New South Wales there’s a bit of a hook right now we’re going to find out how you become a biosecurity team member with the help of dr. Sarah Britain who we met earlier and along with Nathan cutter technical specialist vertebrate pests who are both based at the biosecurity HQ in orange Sarah we discovered earlier that your love for animals began when you grew up on a farm what kind of person did you need to be to become the chief veterinary officer and director of animal biosecurity and welfare in miss out Wales I love that title mouthful yeah well you have to have a real passion for animals that’s part of it but actually only gotta love working with people too because a lot of people go into vet and think it’s just all about the animals but a lot of it’s about dealing with the people the other thing being chief veterinary officer you need to have a real desire to protect the animal industries in New South Wales and contribute to the national protection of our market access and the health and being able to trade with our partners and ensuring that we don’t get diseases that cripple us so imagine you’re working with vets that are specialized in lots of different areas – so you don’t not everyone’s going to be the chief vet but there’s just so much room to have experienced vets across lots of specialties that’s right yeah we’ve got that so that working all sorts of areas so we partner with the vets that are in private practice we’ve got vets that might be actually working in labs we’ve got bets that might be actually what’s called an epidemiologist that they’ll be doing stuff to work out how the disease spreads and models it we’ve got vets the partners in industries that work with all our peak industries and the list goes on well now as a technical specialist for vertebrate pests Nathan would you say you’d have to love buy or all that yeah already though I do so you’d have to love biology and how’d you get into it what what what’s your background what took it away you are so biology chemistry all the sciences so I grew up in the country or I came from the Riverina but in high school like you guys are I have found a love for science and pursued that went off to the city for a little while but I found I was really a country boy so I I worked in labs in the city but wanted to get back to agriculture wanted to get back to the country so now I work in in the biosecurity area so in the invasive plants and animals area and that allows me to work with communities with vets like Sarah with with lab technicians still so we’re doing a lot of work checking out animals that are coming in to dpi so we can ensure that none of those animals have biosecurity risks the we that might affect our environment or our trade or even our ways of life so we have an amazing asset here in Australia best country in the world and we need to protect that that’s what I’m passionate about getting out helping communities helping people to look after after the beautiful country that we have yeah yeah I totally agree and look I think girls and guys the thing to think about is that everything Nathan and Sarah have been talking about and all those different jobs you don’t have to be or you don’t have to have grown up in the country to get involved with agriculture there’s so many opportunities for people living in the city to start a career regardless of what your family’s done you can change course and get involved in agriculture whether you live in Sydney Brisbane Melbourne or any any town along the coast you can get involved now now Nathan and so are you happy to stay during question time because we’ve got a few questions coming in and the first one is and it’s come from condo bland high school what excites you about your work in biosecurity I think one of them not any day is the same you go to work you don’t know what you’re going to get and it’s different all the time but it’s also really exciting with the people you work with the variety of people you work with and just what we do you know a lot of it is really cutting edge and we’re actually doing something that makes a real difference to everybody in Australia Nathan yes I agree with Sarah yeah so I could come into work one day and think I think I’ve got my day planned yeah and I hit get hit broadside but it’s really important work you know something’s happen for example we had a very strange tortoise come in to us that we had to move very quickly on it was it was something that I had to shelve everything you just don’t know what you might be hit with on a day-to-day basis so it’s the excitement it’s working with a whole heap of professionals that I really love working with it’s a great team well thank you for thank you for those couple of those if we got I think I’m getting some movement behind the camera there girls and boys we’ve got a caption winner and drumroll can I have a drum roll please Sarah and Nathan just some sort of ladies and gentlemen boys and girls girls and guys around New South Wales it gives me great pleasure in this very first biosecurity satellite broadcast to announce that the winner of the first caption what did we cut is the person the caption the caption captain for 2018 is wait for it can I see them on the screen I want to watch them go out I want to watch them jump I can see them they’re down the bottom put your hands together girls and boys and buy them for the dog in the HD [Applause] that’s it thank you right thanks thanks for joining in the broadcast it’s been great to meet you both I’m just going to start to wrap things up now I suppose girls and guys I want to leave you with two well a final challenge what I want you to do you don’t have to do it now because I assume you’re probably very close to heading home but tonight or tomorrow when you come back to school but while it’s fresh don’t leave it rot on the vine I want you to write down two things you’ve discovered today two things that all of the different specialists might pick something that Sarah said might have been Robert might have been rod but pick two things you’ve discovered today and then the other one this one for me is the key one thing that you’re going to action post the actions up on a classroom wall and keep each other motivated to achieve those actions and don’t forget to check out the DPI Facebook page where you can learn more about what’s going on and ways that you can be you can actually be an agent of change you can be a vector that goes out there and spreads this information through your parents through your neighbors through your community through your school you’re the future and your future relies on your observations and when you join in to the biosecurity observation team to the detectives then you’re going to make this place safe for decades and centuries to come thank you so much for being here it’s been an absolute treat to be able to host and deliver these wonderful specialists to you in your classrooms and the best part about that is with all this technology we’ve saved from a sustainability point of view there was no need for buses and planes and accommodation and energy and energy and energy we just put it through this latest tech and brought it right to you so boys and girls from here in tow Cal at the beautiful tow Cal homestead I’m Costa and I’m signing off till next time see ya give us a wave give us a clap see your Evans by Fowler ki ogle Cole Hawthorne coffs harbour there you are get a coughs Kempsey not far from their condo blend collie Amber Lee I’m Gary Evans River I think I mentioned that thanks apes everyone great to meet see ya you

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